Does Exercise Help You Learn? 7 Ways Working Out Can Better Your Brain

It seems a little too easy to stockpile all of the benefits of exercise for your mind, body, and spirit, but I’m going to take this opportunity to add yet another one to the list. You probably already know that exercise can help decrease anxiety, improve mood, and it keeps your body healthy, all the way from your cells right down to your bones. But there are also ways that sweating your ass off and practicing regular exercise can help you learn and better your brain power.

Don’t worry — we’re not going to get too technical on you. In fact, the way exercise affects the brain is actually pretty simple. First of all, the increase in heart rate pumps more blood and oxygen to that pink, crinkled powerhouse inside your head, and incites the release of hormones that all make it a more conducive environment for the growth of brain cells.

Regular exercise stimulates brain plasticity (which is the brain’s ability to change and grow throughout a person’s life), and that makes it possible for you to learn new information and retain the stuff you’ve already got up in there.

Dr. Scott McGinnis, a neurologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and an instructor in neurology at Harvard Medical School, said “engaging in a program of regular exercise of moderate intensity over six months or a year is associated with an increase in the volume of selected brain regions.” How’s that for a mind-body connection?

So, whether you just need to get out that pent-up energy from the stress of your day, or you want to boost your brain power before that bio exam, lace up those sneaks and get yourself moving. Here are a few changes you may notice after the fact.

1. You’ll Have More Energy

You probably already know that exercise helps combat fatigue and boosts energy levels. But some studies have even shown that regular workouts can be more effective than other medical stimulants.

2. You’ll Understand Information More Clearly

Learning is about comprehending, right? Well, Elite Daily had the chance to speak with Michael Mackin from MMfitness.ie, who points out,

Endurance training releases a hormone called irisin. This boosts the expression of a protein called BDNF, which helps you learn, improve cognition, and retain information.

Pretty cool, right?

3. Your Memory Will Improve

When your body is aerobically active, you’re actually able to remember more. Participants in an experiment published in the journal of the American College of Sports Medicine were asked to memorize…

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