New Medical Assisted Treatment Program for Addiction Recovery Opens

WholeHealth Recovery Program

We don’t believe in the “Once an addict, always an addict,” train of thought. At WholeHealth, we implement a Biopsychosocial model of recovery, which takes into account the biological, psychological, and the social conditions of the individual patient.

For those struggling with alcohol or substance abuse, as well as their loved ones, addiction seems an insurmountable obstacle to moving forward with life.

The cycle of addiction, withdrawal, recovery, and relapse can appear to be never ending, and the traditional methods of treatment concentrate on harsh detox and strict abstinence programs based on “strength of will” 12 step methods.

The WholeHealth Addiction Recovery Program offers a different approach.

“Addiction is a chronic disease of brain reward neurotransmitters” says Dr. Andrew Petersen, who has spearheaded the clinic’s innovative new program along with his colleague Dr. Trish Henrie-Barrus. “Dysfunction in these neurotransmitters leads to specific biological, psychological, social and spiritual manifestations. However, the typical medical perspective of addiction characterizes it primarily as an inability to abstain from a substance or behavior,” Dr. Petersen explains.

“So, in spite of the reality that addiction is a neurotransmitter problem, the current medical model for treating addiction is not based on correcting this, it is based on having patients abstain from the substance for “long enough”. Dr. Petersen believes that this approach is flawed, which is why long term recovery fails. What sets WholeHealth Recovery apart from other addiction treatment centers is that the initial focus is on correcting neurotransmitter deficiencies through IV amino acid drips.

“We don’t believe in the “Once an addict, always an addict,” train of thought,” says Dr. Trish Henrie-Barrus. “At WholeHealth, we implement a Biopsychosocial model of recovery, which takes into account the biological, psychological, and the social conditions of the individual patient.”

“No two programs are exactly identical,” Dr. Petersen explains, “each individual is screened, evaluated, and a plan tailored to their unique physiology is implemented.” However, he says the main reason for the program’s success is the idea that the brain’s “reward” system (which responds to addictive behavior with pleasure, and to withholding of addictive substances with pain) can literally be rebuilt.

“Most patients enter and leave five or more treatment programs without success,” says Dr. Henrie-Barrus. “Eighty percent or more who do manage to completely detox will relapse in less than a year. Our goal is to get patients well past that one year mark and fully…

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