North Korea, Jacob Zuma, South China Sea: Your Tuesday Briefing

Mr. Trump, seen above in New Jersey on Friday, vented frustration over what he considers insufficient credit for his political strength and the accomplishments of his six-month presidency.

Vice President Mike Pence, meanwhile, denounced a Times report that suggested he was among the Republicans positioning for a possible presidential campaign in 2020.

_____

Photo


Credit
Pool photo by Ahn Young-joon

In South Korea, a verdict could take weeks to arrive in the corruption trial of Lee Jae-yong, vice chairman and heir apparent to Samsung.

As the trial wrapped up on Monday, above, prosecutors recommended that he be sentenced to 12 years in prison for bribing the ousted president Park Geun-hye.

Samsung itself appears fine. Its electronics arm made $10 billion in profit last quarter.

_____

Photo


Credit
Brook Mitchell for The New York Times

• This Aboriginal activist is walking across Australia — from Perth to Canberra — to protest the treatment of Indigenous people.

Clinton Pryor had already walked 4,780 km, nearly 3,000 miles, by the time our bureau chief caught up with him.

“We’re doing this for the grass-roots people,” Mr. Pryor told him. “A lot of people are not being heard.”

_____

Photo


Credit
Mike Hutchings/Reuters

Leadership challenges are a particular focus in Africa this week. President Jacob Zuma of South Africa faces a parliamentary no-confidence motion today — his fifth in eight years, and the first to be determined by secret ballot.

Kenya also votes today in a tightly contested presidential race that has been marked by fears that “fake news” and other toxic behaviors could lead to bloodshed.

And in Rwanda, the re-election of the longtime president, Paul Kagame, by a nearly 99 percent margin punctuated the glaring absence of a viable opposition.

_____

Photo


Credit
24 Hour News, via YouTube

And our Australia crew examines the mysterious sea creatures that chewed up this Melbourne teenager’s legs — and mesmerized people around the world.

The leading theory, hungry sea lice, has not satisfied some experts.

Business

Photo


Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *